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August 12, 2018
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Organizers of the white supremacist Unite the Right 2 rally expected hundreds of supporters to attend the event Sunday in Washington, D.C., but just 24 or so showed up, CNN reports.

Jason Kessler, the organizer of the event, said more people would have shown up but many were confused about transportation. There were at least 1,000 counterprotesters, who shouted, "Nazis go home!" and "Shame! Shame! Shame!" The first Unite the Right rally one year ago in Charlottesville, Virginia, was violent and ended in the death of counterprotester Heather Heyer.

During Sunday's rally, participants listened to a few impromptu speakers, and not long after left in several white vans. One white nationalist told CNN there weren't very many supporters at the rally because "people are scared to come out after what happened last year." Catherine Garcia

August 12, 2018
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More people are likely heading to Washington to fight racism than to support it.

Organizers of last year's "Unite the Right" rally, the white nationalist march that turned violent in Charlottesville, Virginia, are holding a second demonstration in Washington, D.C., on Sunday. Only a few hundred participants are expected at the "white civil rights" protest, and they will probably be well outnumbered by anti-racist counter-protesters.

"[These neo-Nazi groups] are pretty famous for overestimating their turnout and backing down when it turns out that there's a really massive response to what they're doing," a Georgetown professor of justice and peace studies, Mark Lance, told The Hill. In addition to the main event permit, the National Parks Service has granted permits to groups including D.C. United Against Hate and New York Black Lives Matter.

"We have people coming to our city for the sole purpose of spewing hate," Mayor Muriel Bowser said of Unite the Right. "We denounce hate, we denounce anti-Semitism, and we denounce the rhetoric we expect to hear this Sunday." Bonnie Kristian

May 5, 2018

Thousands of demonstrators turned out to protest Russian President Vladimir Putin's upcoming inauguration in Moscow on Saturday. Gathering in Pushkin Square at the city center, they were met by police in riot gear who promptly arrested opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

An estimated 1,000 protesters have been arrested in Moscow and other cities with about 90 anti-Putin rallies, including Saint Petersburg and Krasnoyarsk, a city in Siberia. In Moscow, demonstrators chanted slogans including, "Down with the tsar!" and "Russia without Putin!"

The Russian president faced seven challengers in his March re-election campaign; he won his fourth term with 77 percent of the vote. Navalny, widely considered Putin's most viable electoral challenger, was banned from the ballot. Bonnie Kristian

April 21, 2018

A neo-Nazi march is scheduled for Saturday in the small Georgia city of Newnan, about 40 miles southwest of Atlanta. Anti-fascist counter-protesters are expected as well, and a local church will hold an interfaith service to promote "peace and unity" during the rally.

To prepare for the event, local shopkeepers have removed anything that could be moved or thrown in public spaces, and many will not open for business to decrease opportunities for conflict. Many Newnan residents went shopping the night before to help make up the missing revenue.

And a community nonprofit invited children to make chalk drawings in the local park to undermine the neo-Nazis' message: "It will be hard for the hate group to take serious video footage when a rainbow-colored unicorn is in the shot." Bonnie Kristian

January 22, 2018

Vice President Mike Pence's address before the Israeli parliament Monday was interrupted by protests, The Times of Israel reports. As Pence took his place in front of the Knesset, ministers from Israel's Joint Arab List — a coalition of Israeli-Arab lawmakers — held up signs that read "Jerusalem is the capital of Palestine," protesting the Trump administration's decision last month to recognize Jerusalem as Israel's rightful capital. Security scrambled to remove the protesting ministers from the chamber as most of the other lawmakers in the Knesset applauded loudly:

After the commotion died down, Pence reportedly made note of Israel's "vibrant democracy." Later in the speech, the vice president reaffirmed the decision to recognize Jerusalem and announced that the U.S. would relocate its embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv by the end of next year.

Palestinians want Jerusalem to be the capital of their future state, and some experts believe the Trump administration's policies are a barrier to peace efforts between Israel and Palestine. Read more about the Joint Arab List protests at Haaretz. Kelly O'Meara Morales

December 10, 2017
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Lebanese security forces deployed tear gas and water cannons against protesters outside the U.S. Embassy near Beirut, Lebanon, on Sunday. The demonstrators, who threw rocks and set fires in the road, were protesting President Trump's announcement that the United States will recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Some protesters reportedly attempted to break into the American diplomatic compound by climbing through barbed wire defenses, and Lebanese police barricaded the road near the embassy entrance.

"There is a lot of anger here. What they're chanting is, 'Palestine forgive us, they closed the door on us,' clearly in reference to Arab leaders," said Al Jazeera reporter Zeina Khodr, who was on the scene. "The protesters here feel Arab leaders have just been talking, but not taking any action." Bonnie Kristian

November 26, 2017
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The Pakistani government on Sunday deployed paramilitary forces under military command to respond to protesters who blocked a major highway, set vehicles on fire, and attacked a police checkpoint. At least six protesters were killed in the initial clash and about 200 more people were injured.

The demonstrators have been in the streets for weeks rallying against a proposed parliamentary rule change that would no longer require lawmakers to mention the Prophet Mohammed while taking their oath of office. Protesters have accused the Pakistani law minister, Zahid Hamid, of blasphemy over the proposal and have demanded his resignation.

Hamid issued an apology video Sunday in which he pledged his love for the prophet "from the depth of my heart" and declared his entire family ready to die for Mohammed's honor. Bonnie Kristian

November 18, 2017

Thousands of Zimbabweans marched in the streets in cities around their country on Saturday, demanding an end to the rule of 93-year-old President Robert Mugabe, who has ruled Zimbabwe since 1980 and is widely considered a dictator. Marchers carried signs with slogans like "no to Mugabe dynasty," "this is the Zimbabwe we want," and "selfless not selfish government."

The demonstrations come several days after the Zimbabwean military, backed by the ruling Zanu-PF party, put Mugabe and his wife, Grace, under house arrest. The couple are "ready to die for what is correct" and will not step down, Mugabe's nephew said Saturday as the army, which supports the protests, prevented demonstrators from marching into the Mugabes' official residence. Bonnie Kristian

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