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oh how the polls have turned
January 24, 2019

President Trump's approval rating has fallen to a year-long low, with a strong majority of Americans blaming him for the record-long partial government shutdown, according to a new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Thirty-four percent of Americans approve of Trump's job performance, down from 42 percent one month earlier. That level is now near the lowest of Trump's presidency. Trump's approval among Republicans remains near 80 percent, but among independents it's near a two-year low. A majority of the survey's respondents reject Trump's rationale for building a wall on the Mexican border. Trump says he will not accept any deal to reopen the government if it doesn't include $5.7 billion to pay for the wall.

The poll was conducted Jan. 16 to 20 using a sample of 1,062 adults who were interviewed by phone. The margin of error is 4.1 percentage points. Read more at The Associated Press. Harold Maass

December 14, 2018

For those who say the midterms just ended and 2020 talk is too early: We hear you. Nevertheless, a CNN/SRSS poll is here, and we must listen.

A Democratic primary poll released Friday puts former Vice President Joe Biden on top of the list of potential Democratic candidates, with a convincing 30 percent of voters supporting him. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) comes behind him with 14 percent, and Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-Texas) is next in line with 9 percent.

Of course, none of these top candidates have fully committed to running for president. And in December 2014 — a little less than 2 years ahead of 2016's election — that race's winner hadn't announced his candidacy either. In fact, a CNN poll from four years ago predicted we'd see some now-forgotten faces on top of a GOP primary.

That's right, remember Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, and Ben Carson? Since topping this poll, they've most recently gained attention for doing nothing, turning down White House jobs, and purchasing a very expensive table, respectively. Eventual President Trump doesn't even appear on the list, suggesting Democrats' next leader could still be yet to come.

CNN's most recent poll surveyed 1,015 people — 463 of whom were Democrats — from Dec. 6-9 via landline and cell phone, with a 3.8 percent margin of error. Kathryn Krawczyk

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