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October 11, 2018

President Trump seemed to be having the time of his life speaking with Fox & Friends this morning.

In a conversation that lasted nearly an hour, Trump ricocheted from one topic to the next, commenting on everything from Hurricane Michael to the infamous anonymous New York Times op-ed to Bob Woodward's new book. He went after his political opponents, calling former Attorney General Eric Holder's recent comments that "when they go low, we kick them" "disgusting" and saying, "He better be careful what he's wishing for."

Trump also kept up his criticism of the Federal Reserve, saying it's "getting a little bit too cute." He again floated the wild accusation that The New York Times actually wrote that anonymous op-ed themselves, saying there's a "very good chance" the Times made it up, although they "probably" didn't. Near the end of the interview, Trump also went after his former chief economic adviser Gary Cohn, a key player in Woodward's book, saying, "I could tell stories about him like you wouldn't believe."

But it wasn't all threats and trash-talking. Trump did take a moment to laud some praise on Kanye West, calling him a "genius."

As Trump spoke, Florida was waking up to the destruction left in the wake of Hurricane Michael, and Georgia was bracing for impact. The president defended his decision to hold a political rally on Wednesday even as the storm pummeled the Florida Panhandle, saying it would have been "unfair" to his supporters to cancel the Pennsylvania rally and that only his "haters" actually cared that he kept it on. He also said the recovery in Florida would "go fast."

The hosts of Fox & Friends attempted to wind down the interview with Trump a few times, finally bringing it to a close about 50 minutes after the president called in, with Steve Doocy telling Trump to "go run the country." Watch a small portion of Trump's interview below. Brendan Morrow

11:09 p.m.

In 2016 and 2017, anti-money laundering specialists at Deutsche Bank flagged several transactions involving accounts controlled by President Trump and his son-in-law, Jared Kushner, as suspicious, but executives chose to ignore their reports, current and former bank employees told The New York Times.

Multiple transactions, some involving Trump's now-shuttered foundation, set off alerts in a computer system that detects potentially illegal activity, the employees said. Workers are supposed to look over these transactions, and those deemed suspicious are reported to the Treasury Department unit covering financial crimes.

In one case, the computer system flagged several transactions involving Kushner's real estate company during the summer of 2016. Former anti-money laundering specialist Tammy McFadden told the Times she looked over the transactions, and discovered money had been moved from Kushner Companies to Russian individuals, and she determined these transactions should be reported. Instead of going to anti-money laundering experts, her report and supporting documents went to New York managers who were part of the private bank, which works with the extremely wealthy, the Times reports. They chose not to forward her report to the government, and McFadden told the Times she believes their decision was motivated by their desire to maintain the private-banking division's close relationship with Kushner.

Deutsche Bank has lent both Trump and Kushner companies billions of dollars, even when other financial institutions wouldn't work with Trump. Congressional and state authorities investigating the relationship between Trump and Deutsche Bank have requested records related to Trump; in April, the Trump Organization sued the bank, attempting to block it from complying with congressional subpoenas. For more on the suspicious Kushner and Trump-related transactions, visit The New York Times. Catherine Garcia

9:57 p.m.

JoJo, ScarCo — whatever you want to call them, celebrity couple Scarlett Johansson and Colin Jost are engaged.

Johansson's publicist Marcel Pariseau shared the news with The Associated Press on Sunday. The actress met the Saturday Night Live comedian two years ago. Pariseau told AP they have not yet set a wedding date.

Johansson, 34, has been married twice; she wed actor Ryan Reynolds in 2008, divorcing in 2011, and French journalist Romain Dauriac in 2014, divorcing in 2017. Johansson and Dauriac have a 4-year-old daughter, Rose. Jost, 36, has never been married. Catherine Garcia

9:35 p.m.

Robert F. Smith gave a commencement speech on Sunday that won't ever be forgotten by Morehouse College's Class of 2019.

The billionaire founder of investment firm Vista Equity Partners announced that he is creating a grant that will cover the cost of every single student loan held by all 396 graduating seniors. "On behalf of the eight generations of my family who have been in this country, we're going to put a little fuel in your bus," he said.

The graduates erupted in cheers and gave Smith a standing ovation. Morehouse President David A. Thomas told CNN Smith's "liberation gift" will cover about $40 million worth of loans. "When you have to service debt, the choices about what you can go do in the world are constrained," he said, adding that Smith's generosity "gives them the liberty to follow their dreams, their passions." Smith encouraged the graduates to pay it forward, so other students can benefit and "have all the opportunities of the American dream."

After commencement, students — and their parents — were still in a daze. Graduate Elijah Nesly Dormeus is the first of nine siblings to graduate from college, and told CNN that after his dad died when he was a kid, his mother sacrificed and worked hard to provide for her family. He has $90,000 in student loans, and his mother also took out a loan to help him. Smith's gift benefits both tremendously, and "all of her serving, all her giving was not in vain," Dormeus said. Catherine Garcia

8:57 p.m.

The Keanu Reeves thriller John Wick: Chapter 3 knocked Avengers: Endgame from the top of the box office, bringing in an estimated $57 million in North American ticket sales over the weekend.

Avengers: Endgame, which dominated the box office three weekends in a row, came in second place with an estimated $29.4 million in ticket sales. Pokémon Detective Pikachu finished third, with an estimated $24.8 million. John Wick: Chapter 3 had a massive opening weekend compared to the first movies in the series: John Wick brought in $14.4 million in 2014, and John Wick: Chapter Two earned $30.4 million in 2017, Entertainment Weekly reports.

Avengers: Endgame has brought in $2.62 billion globally, second only to 2009's Avatar, which earned $2.78 billion. Thanks to its weekend ticket sales, Avengers: Endgame is now the second-highest grossing movie domestically, at $771 million; 2015's Star Wars: The Forces Awakens is still No. 1, with $937 million. Catherine Garcia

1:00 p.m.

It's well-documented that Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) does not get along with President Trump.

The two have feuded for years, and Romney even singled out the president when he said he was "sickened" by the findings in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report on his investigation into 2016 Russian election interference (though he does not support impeachment.) Romney told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday's State of the Union that Trump "has distanced himself from some of the best qualities of the human character." Not very flattering.

But Romney set aside his personal grievances in the very same interview, telling Tapper that the path Trump has chosen to take in regards to trade with China is the right one. Romney said China "has gotten away with murder for years" by skirting around foreign commerce rules and regulations, allowing Beijing to steal technology and intellectual property, all while harming U.S. businesses. So, while the senator understands Americans will bear the brunt of the sanctions, he believes it's a crucial sacrifice.

At the same time, Romney made clear that China is the only case where he supports tariffs. He said he thought Trump's recently-lifted tariffs on metal imports from Mexico and Canada were a bad idea, and he doesn't support potential taxes on Japanese and European automobile imports. Tim O'Donnell

12:34 p.m.

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan told host Margaret Brennan on Sunday's Face the Nation that, yes, his organization is relocating migrants to sanctuary cities. But it's not part of President Trump's self-described "sick idea" to anger those cities that do not cooperate with federal immigration authorities.

Instead, McAleenan said the transport efforts are based on "necessity and capacity" to safely process the migrants. For example, due to overcrowding at facilities in Texas, the agency has begun flying hundreds of migrants to San Diego to increase efficiency. While several of the cities and states that will take in the relocated migrants are, in fact, "sanctuaries," McAleenan said that their selection was not intentional or politically motivated.

But not everyone's buying it. While not responding directly to McAleenan's comments, Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) later told Brennan that he thinks the Trump administration is sticking to the sanctuary city idea with the intention of sending migrants to states they "don't care about," implying that it is, indeed, politically motivated. He said that the only reason White House backed out of a decision to send migrants to Florida cities is because the state's Republican governor, Ron DeSantis, called the idea "unacceptable." Tim O'Donnell

11:33 a.m.

Iran and the United States have both fervently expressed that they do not seek war with one another, despite heightened tensions. Now, Saudi Arabia, a longtime U.S. ally and rival of Iran, has proclaimed a similar aversion to warfare with Iran. But, as was the case with Iran and the U.S., the kingdom left open the possibility for conflict should they have no other choice.

Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel al-Jubeir on Sunday said Saudi Arabia does not want or seek war with Iran, but if Iran strikes first, "the kingdom will respond with all force and determination" to defend itself. Riyadh has accused Tehran of ordering drone strikes on two Saudi Arabian oil pumping stations last Tuesday, though Yemen's Iran-aligned Houthi group claimed responsibility and Iran has denied involvement.

Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman reportedly recently discussed strengthening security and stability in the Gulf region with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and he also called for a meeting later in May with other Gulf State leaders to discuss implications of Iran's possible proxy attacks. "The ball is in their court," Jubeir said, referring to Iran. Read more at Reuters. Tim O'Donnell

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