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January 21, 2018

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) on Sunday roundly rejected President Trump's proposal that the Senate GOP go "nuclear" to end the government shutdown without Democrats' help. "I can tell you that would be the end of the Senate as it was originally devised and created going back to our founding fathers," Durbin said in an interview on ABC. "We have to acknowledge our respect for the minority, and that is what the Senate tries to do in its composition and in its procedure."

When Democrats controlled the Senate in years past, Durbin did not seem to hold this view. In 2014, for example, he defended Democrats' 2013 decision to invoke the nuclear option with judicial nominees by arguing Democrats had "no choice" because of Republican obstructionism.

But this time, Durbin has Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) on his side; McConnell said through a representative Sunday he "opposes changing the rules on legislation." Watch an excerpt of Durbin's comments on ABC below. Bonnie Kristian

10:07 p.m. ET
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Stacey Abrams won Georgia's Democratic gubernatorial primary on Tuesday, defeating former state Rep. Stacey Evans.

Both women are attorneys in the Atlanta area. Abrams is the former Georgia state House minority leader, and is the first female nominee for governor in Georgia from either major party, The Associated Press reports. If she wins in November's general election, she will become the first black female governor in the United States.

On the Republican side, five men are running in the primary, and unless one of them receives more than 50 percent of the vote, there will be a runoff between the top two on July 24. The candidates are Lt. Gov Casey Cagle; Secretary of State Brian Kemp; former state Sen. Hunter Hill; state Sen. Michael Williams; and Clay Tippins. Catherine Garcia

9:42 p.m. ET
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Retired Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath won the Democratic House primary in Kentucky's 6th congressional district on Tuesday, defeating Lexington Mayor Jim Gray.

She will face Republican Rep. Andy Barr in November. Democrats are looking to flip the seat in a district that voted for President Trump by a 16-point margin in 2016. McGrath spent 20 years in the service, retiring from the Marine Corps last June as a lieutenant colonel. Catherine Garcia

9:03 p.m. ET
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On Tuesday, President Trump announced that before November, he plans on proposing new tax cuts.

The new tax cuts would be revealed ahead of the mid-term elections, as Republicans try to keep their majority. Trump said he would meet with the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-Texas), to discuss his proposal, but did not give out any additional details, Reuters reports. Catherine Garcia

8:38 p.m. ET
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The Kilauea volcano continues to erupt on Hawaii's Big Island, and people in its vicinity are being warned not to breathe in the lava haze, or "laze," that results when lava mixes with seawater.

When lava is cooled by seawater, a glass forms. When that glass shatters, tiny shards are picked up by clouds of steam. Those clouds contain hydrochloric acid, which is also formed when lava and seawater mix. Hydrochloric acid can irritate the skin and eyes and make it hard to breathe. While laze "looks innocuous, it's not," Janet Babb, a geologist with the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, told The Associated Press.

Masks that are being passed out to local residents can keep out volcanic ash, but cannot filter the hydrochloric acid. Authorities are also warning people to stay far away from where the lava is entering the ocean, as waves can wash over the lava and send scorching hot water onto the shore. So far, the lava has destroyed about 40 homes, and officials have moved 50,000 gallons of flammable gas that had been stored at a geothermal plant near one of the volcano's vents. Catherine Garcia

7:42 p.m. ET
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Mark and Christina Rotondo have a great "worst roommate ever" story to share, except they might want to leave out the part about having raised him.

The Rotondos live in Camillus, New York, and say that they tried for months to get their 30-year-old son, Michael, to move out. They sent him five notes, CBS News reports, with the first one, dated Feb. 2, stern, ordering Michael to "leave this house immediately. You have 14 days to vacate. You will not be allowed to return." On Feb. 13, they busted out the legalese: "You are hereby evicted. You have heretofore been our guest and there is no lease or agreement that gives you any right to stay here without our consent."

When that didn't work, the Rotondos turned to bribery, telling Michael that if he left, they would give him $1,100, and his mother would help him find employment. "There are jobs available even for those with a poor work history like you," the note said. "Get one — you have to work!" He still refused to leave, and the Rotondos took their son to state supreme court. On Tuesday, a judge ordered Michael out. He maintains that his parents did not give him enough time to leave, and called the decision "outrageous." Next time, just change the locks — it's cheaper, faster, and a lot less embarrassing. Catherine Garcia

6:36 p.m. ET
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The House voted Tuesday 258-159 to roll back rules for midsize and regional banks put in place after the 2008 financial crisis to prevent a repeat of that catastrophe.

The bill, already passed by the Senate, allows banks with up to $250 billion in assets to avoid supervision from the Fed and stress tests. Under Dodd-Frank, banks with at least $50 billion in assets had to abide by tougher financial rules. Republican lawmakers say easing the regulations will make it easier for small banks and credit unions to lend more money to people, but some Democrats have warned this bill does assist larger banks, and several of those failed during the financial crisis.

The bill does not affect the biggest banks, like Bank of America and Wells Fargo. President Trump could sign the bill as early as this week. Catherine Garcia

5:30 p.m. ET
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One of Michael Cohen's business partners, Evgeny Freidman, is cooperating with federal prosecutors who are probing Cohen's business dealings, The New York Times reports.

Freidman on Tuesday pleaded guilty to tax evasion, but has reportedly agreed to be a witness to avoid jail time. Investigators are looking into Cohen, President Trump's longtime fixer and lawyer, as part of the larger probe into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. Freidman's plea deal could be used to pressure Cohen into cooperating with Special Counsel Robert Mueller, the Times reports.

Cohen and Freidman were longtime partners in the taxi business; Freidman even earned the nickname "Taxi King" for managing so many cabs and taxi medallions. He was facing up to 25 years in prison for multiple charges of tax fraud, but will instead receive five years of probation if he fulfills his promise to help federal agents. Read more at The New York Times. Summer Meza

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